How Soon can I expect my Periods to Return after the Birth of my Baby?

How Soon can I expect my Periods to Return after the Birth of my Baby?

How soon menstruation occurs depends largely on whether a mother is breast or bottle-feeding. The bottle feeding mother can expect a period as early as one month from delivery or as late as three – possibly four months. Normally, the periods then continue to occur as before. However, it’s important to remember that ovulation normally precedes a period, and in this event fertility has resumed and pregnancy is again possible. The mother who is totally breast feeding with not more than four hours between feeds is not likely to ovulate and periods may not return for several months, possibly a year or more. However, any change in the feeding habit, such as baby sleeping longer e.g. through the night, use of a soother (pacifier), introduction of formula feeds or solids, illness of mother or baby may bring about a change and push towards returning ovulation. The signs of ovulation are: a reduction in milk supply, baby fretfulness; breast milk becomes slightly more salty at ovulation time and dissatisfies baby. This can alert the mother to look for more accurate signs of the return of fertility. For Example: A change in the vaginal area suggests ovarian activity and returning fertility; (1) a return of mucous following a period of dryness or (2) any change in the type of mucous already present since the normal post natal bleeding (lochia) ceased. Some women may also experience slight abdominal pain, backache or / and spotting/bleeding at ovulation time. The arrival of a period 2- 3 weeks later confirms...
What are after-pains?

What are after-pains?

For some days following labour, intermittent pains or “contractions” of the womb are still to be felt giving rise to the so-called after-pains. These are more common following a second or subsequent birth as the multiparous womb (having had one or more babies) is less active due to a small space being left inside, which fills up with secretions from the healing afterbirth site. This stimulates the womb to contract in the attempt to expel the secretions and can cause quite severe pain and discomfort. Following a first birth, the walls of the womb come together more closely, virtually emptying the womb completely of all secretions, therefore contractions are less likely to occur. After-pains are also stimulated by breastfeeding, and though uncomfortable for some, this helps the womb to return to normal. Involution of the other generative organs – ovaries and fallopian tubes takes place a little more slowly than that of the womb. Mild painkillers as taken for a headache will alleviate the discomfort of after-pains. If breastfeeding, it’s best to check with your doctor before taking any medication as this can be transmitted to the...